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223 %
£2,238.00
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by 39 supporters
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andrew warling avatar
andrew warling

NAP Men in Kilts

Wear kilts to the Christmas party FULL MONTY style for N.S.P.K.U. because we wanted to raise money for a good cause

223 %
£2,238.00
raised of £1,000 target
by 39 supporters
Donate

N.S.P.K.U.

We exist to help & support people with PKU. to promote the care & treatment of PKU's.

Charity Registration No. 273670

Story

The scene - A little get together of NAP engineering management playing a few old school party games like Ludo, Guess who, Kerplunk and Operation arranged by the two best PA's in the world whilst having a few drinks and fun, resulted in a few more attendees and a few more drinks and as most men do turned to the subject of what to wear at the WP Christmas party. Hands were held in the room and a pact was formed between the Scotsmen, the Northern Irish man, Englishman, Indian man, Nigerian man and a former member of a boyband

The Pact - To wear kilts to the Christmas party, majority of the men being rookies in the art of kilt wearing so no mean feat wear such a garment - The history of the kilt stretches back to at least the end of the 16th century. The kilt first appeared as the belted plaid or great kilt, a full length garment whose upper half could be worn as a cloak draped over the shoulder, or brought up over the head as a hood. The small kilt or walking kilt (similar to the 'modern' kilt) did not develop until the late 17th or early 18th century, and is essentially the bottom half of the great kilt. The word kilt comes from the Scots word kilt meaning to tuck up the clothes around the body.

The Deal - If a target of £1k is met, there is a commitment among the NAP men that they will be "true Scotsmen" for one evening only, that means a one off not to be a repeated event of no underwear for this motley crew with all shapes and sizes covered. There is also a further commitment of no handstands or cartwheels on the dance floor during the evening.

The cause - my grandson Henry was born with Phenylketonuria (PKU for short) in August this year. PKU is a rare inherited condition in which there is a build up of phenylalanine in the body. Phenylalanine is a natural substance; it is a building block of protein. PKU is looked for in all newborns in the United Kingdom by measuring phenylalanine levels in the heel-prick blood test. All babies should have this test as it allows treatment to start early in life.

Phenylalanine is found in the protein part of the food we eat. The treatment is a low protein diet. This means that high protein foods such as meat, cheese, poultry, eggs and milk are not permitted. Instead the diet is supplemented with artificial protein which contains no phenylalanine. This diet is very effective at lowering levels of phenylalanine and allows normal growth and development of the child.

Untreated PKU can lead to intellectual disability, seizures, behavioural problems, and mental disorders.

The damage done to the brain if PKU is untreated during the first months of life is not reversible. It is critical to control the diet of infants with PKU very carefully so that the brain has an opportunity to develop normally. Affected children who are detected at birth and treated are much less likely to develop neurological problems or have seizures and intellectual disability (though such clinical disorders are still possible.)

     

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