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£220.00
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Sophie Eggleton avatar
Sophie Eggleton

Sophies Charity Skydive

Fundraising for The Hepatitis C Trust

22 %
£220.00
raised of £1,000 target
by 18 supporters
Donate
  • Event: Sophie Eggleton's fundraising

The Hepatitis C Trust

The Hepatitis C Trust is the national UK charity for hep C. It was founded and is led and run by people with personal experience of hepatitis C. We work to deliver a whole range of services including awareness and testing, advocacy and support with the ultimate goal of preventing unnecessary deaths.

Charity Registration No. 1104279

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In April I will be doing a tandem skydive from 12,000 feet in an effort to raise money for two charities, one being the Hepatitus C Trust. I have attended a few of their fundraising and awareness building events and I am always bowled over by the work they do. 

Hepatitis C is a blood-borne virus that predominantly infects the cells of the liver. This can cause inflammation of and sometimes significant damage to the liver and affect its ability to perform its many, varied and essential functions. Although it has always been regarded as a liver disease (hepatitis means inflammation of the liver), recent research has shown that hepatitis C affects a number of other areas of the body including the digestive system, the lymphatic system, the immune system and the brain.

Hepatitis C was discovered in the 1980s when it became apparent that there was a new virus (not hepatitis A or B) causing liver damage. It was known as non-A non-B hepatitis until it was properly identified in 1989. A screening process was developed in 1991 that made it possible to detect it in blood samples. It is thus a relatively newly identified disease and there are still many aspects of it that are little or poorly understood.

I wanted to raise awareness as well as money for  a charity that offers such great support to sufferers and their families as well as those living with the after affects of treatment. 

So please dig deep and donate now.

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