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Rosie Edmondson

Rosie, Matt and Jess run 10k for Dyspraxia

Great Newham London Run 10K for Dyspraxia Foundation because It's a charity close to our hearts

158 %
£316.00
raised of £200 target
by 26 supporters
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  • Team members: Matt, Jessica
  • Event: Morrisons Great Newham London Run 2015, 19 Jul 2015

Dyspraxia Foundation

We aim to improve awareness & understanding to support all those affected by dyspraxia

Charity Registration No. 1058352

Story

We are fundraising for The Dyspraxia Foundation by taking part in the The Great Newham London Run. This is a full 10k run, around the London 2012 Olympic Park finishing inside the stadium itself! The same track as Olympic greats Mo Farah and Usain Bolt! 

Yes us run, seriously, think The Chuckle Brothers meets uncoordinated ducks about to take off, but all for a great cause! 

Rosie -  who is dyspraxic -  has always found hand eye co-ordination spatial awareness and gross motor skills quite difficult and challenging as well as fine motor skills and the emotional effects throughout the years. 

So she is challenging herself and is determined to show to other people what people with dyspraxia can and will achieve - anything is possible! 

She will be running alongside my boyfriend Matt, and close friend Jess for this great cause! 

The Dyspraxia Foundation were my parents first port of call when I was diagnosed age 4 and thanks to their help they didn't feel alone. My family are very grateful for everything they have done and me and Matt are determined to raise as much awareness, understanding and money for such a great charity and misunderstood way of thinking we will be updating our journey on my blog which is set up to raise awareness of dyspraxia/dyslexia and celebrating difference, creativity and neurodiversity in a positive light.

http://thinkoutsideofthecardboardbox.blogspot.co.uk/

Dyspraxia affects about six per cent of the population and affects the organisation and co-ordination of movement, thought and sometimes speech. You can’t see dyspraxia and while sufferers can be very clever, everyday activities like tying shoes laces, riding a bike, taking a telephone message and even making a sandwich can be difficult. Awareness of the condition is low and difficulties are often misinterpreted as laziness or naughtiness. People with dyspraxia can suffer low self-esteem, have difficulties making friends and are vulnerable to bullying. Without the right sort of help and support these people are at increased risk of mental ill-health, social isolation and under achievement, academically and in the workplace. With the right help and support from charities like Dyspraxia Foundation people can help gain confidence and coping strategies. 

So please dig deep and donate now.

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